Trudeau and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to signal hydrogen deal in Newfoundland

The mission was registered with the province in June and is now topic to a provincial environmental evaluation

HALIFAX — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz are set to signal a inexperienced power settlement later this month in Newfoundland that would show pivotal to Canada’s nascent hydrogen trade.

The German authorities on Friday issued a press release confirming the settlement will probably be signed Aug. 23 in Stephenville, the place a Newfoundland based mostly firm plans to construct a zero-emission plant that may use wind power to provide hydrogen for export.

You are reading: Trudeau and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to signal hydrogen deal in Newfoundland

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The corporate, World Power GH2, has stated it desires to construct a close-by onshore wind farm to energy a hydrogen manufacturing facility on the deep-sea port at Stephenville.

The mayor of Stephenville, Tom Rose, says Trudeau and Scholz will probably be joined by cupboard ministers and a delegation of German enterprise leaders who will attend a inexperienced power commerce present earlier than the signing ceremony.

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Rose says Stephenville is a perfect place for a wind farm and hydrogen manufacturing plant as a result of the world is thought for having a world-class “wind hall,” and it has the means to provide the big quantities of business water wanted for hydrogen manufacturing.

The mission was registered with the province in June and is now topic to a provincial environmental evaluation.

On Saturday, the Prime Minister’s Workplace confirmed Trudeau will accompany the chancellor on a short Canadian go to that may embody earlier stops in Montreal and Toronto, beginning Aug. 21.

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